George A. D’Angelo – Obituary – Official

August 26th, 2018

George A. D'Angelo & his daughter VictoriaGeorge A. D’Angelo, Esq. and daughter Victoria circa 1993

George A. D’Angelo, Esq., age 91, of Bryn Mawr, PA, died on April 16, 2018. Cause of death unknown.

You may not have known him personally, but you might have noticed a very elegant man dashing to or from his Center City Philadelphia law office, lunch or civic, charitable or cultural meetings or events. He was often described as a true gentleman.

You could tell the seasons by his attire. In summer, he wore his characteristic straw boater and summer three-piece suit which was often a seersucker suit. Like clockwork, on September 15 each year, he switched to his black bowler and darker three-piece pinstripe suit. On a lovely summer evening, you might have noticed him driving his 1949 Cadillac convertible, stopping by Two Street to enjoy an outdoor Mummers concert or swinging by Downey’s for a bite or dining at the Four Seasons or the Philadelphia Club where he often had lunch with friends.

Dad in London

George A. D’Angelo, Esq. in London 1974 to attend a friend’s daughter’s formal wedding.

Born in Philadelphia on December 7, 1926 to Dominic and Lillian D’Angelo, he graduated from Central High School in 1944. He received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania in 1947 and his law degree (JD) from its Law School in 1950 where he graduated in the top five of his class.

He joined Truscott & Erisman, and then formed D’Angelo & Eurell.

He was an Adjunct Professor at Temple University Law School (1954-1969), teaching both professional responsibility and the practice of law. His classes were always oversubscribed which he attributed to his being the only Republican professor there.

His philanthropic interests were mostly in the arts and education in Philadelphia and New York As President of the Philadelphia Art Alliance (1975-1981), he brought in many innovative shows. He remained active as a member of its Board and even as Emeritus he regularly participated in meetings until his retirement. He also recognized the value of education and supported a number of scholarships.

He was honored to have served as President of the Episcopal Church Club of Philadelphia, as Treasurer of the Lawyers Club of Philadelphia, on the Vestry of the Church of St. Asaph’s, and on the Boards of Promesa Foundation, New York, City Innovation, New York, and Hayes Manor Retirement Community, Philadelphia.

He was a member of the Order of the Coif, Pennsylvania 50, Pennsylvania Bar Association, American Bar Association, Philadelphia Bar Association, Philadelphia Club, The Athenaeum, Merion Cricket Club, English-Speaking Union, Doubles (New York), Rittenhouse Club, Philobiblon Club, and a friend of the American Philosophical Society.

He loved to travel, speaking often of how it broadened one’s horizons and perspectives, and of the joy of meeting interesting people from different countries and cultures around the world. Part of his work recently took him to a number of countries in Africa, as part of efforts working with various African agencies to promote tourism and the expansion of investment in Africa. He enjoyed reading, particularly biographies and history, and the theater. He especially enjoyed musicals, notably Gilbert & Sullivan, and was a great ballroom dancer.

He also was an avid sailor and made sure his kids knew how to sail.

George A. D'Angelo, his kids

George A. D’Angelo, father, with his four children circa 1964

He is predeceased by his wife, Antonia Billett D’Angelo (1928-1986) who had a Masters in Psychiatric Social Work and was world-renown in the field for the prevention and treatment of alcoholism and drug abuse, with a particular focus on women’s issues. They met in English Class on her first day at the University of Pennsylvania.

He is survived by his four children, in order of appearance; Marc Scott D’Angelo, Christopher Scott D’Angelo, David Steven D’Angelo, and Victoria Scott Yeager and his longtime companion, Brenda Barak.

Memorial will be held October 21, 2018 at 1:30pm at St. Asaph’s Church: 27 Conshohocken State Rd Bala Cynwyd, PA:  Please do not send flowers – Donations may be made to the General Chuck Yeager Foundation PO Box 1507; Penn Valley, CA 95946.

c. GCYI

Dad – Part II

June 3rd, 2018

Dad and I often reminisced about when his kids, including me, were little.

After church, he would go to the best Jewish deli and get bagels, bialies, lox, cream cheese, and the best French light donuts. Everyone else liked chocolate icing. I liked vanilla icing so never had to fight for mine (probably learned to like it from birth in preemptory self-defense).

Afterwards, we’d go for a drive to some historic place in downtown Philadelphia. I remember Society Hill with the houses from pre-American Revolution and the Swedish church and cemetery.

On the way home, we’d stop and feed the horses in Fairmount Park some sugar. That was fun.

We often drove in his 1949 Cadillac convertible. When we were very young – we all fit in the back seat, while Mom and he looked elegant in their individual styles of dress. We were dressed well too, I would be in pretty dress, white socks, Mary Janes and white gloves. My brothers wore suits and ties and hats, all looking good.

We went to plays and musicals often. Afterwards, he would take us to the ice cream parlor down on I think 2nd street. We’d get home late. I would be asleep so Dad would carry me from the car to my room for Mom to help me change into pajamas. I remember his strong arms picking me up as I, half asleep, felt safe and loved.

In Fairmount Park, until it became unsafe, Dad would take us sledding. I’d ride on his back and almost go flying when we went over the one huge bump at the bottom. What fun we had.

I’m lucky I got many chances, and took them, to thank Dad for all he did for and with us.

While he worked hard, he always came home for dinner. He would ask each of us about our day. Mom would always burn the rolls. On Sundays we would go out to dinner.

At first it was Horn & Hardart’s – https://philly.curbed.com/2012/6/25/10358406/philly-horn-hardart-reminiscences

They had those old-fashioned (now) cubbyholes with glass on them. One would select what one wanted, put a nickel in, open the door. Very simple. Very nutritional. No fat.

Then when they went out of business, we went to IHOP.

I never remember my brothers or me ever misbehaving in a restaurant. If we were tired, we were allowed to rest our head on the back of the chair and go to sleep.

 

 

 

Documentary Notes

June 3rd, 2018

Every time we return to this area in France, we learn something new from General Chuck Yeager’s adventures (to say the least) when he was shot down near Grignols, southeast of Bordeaux.

This time we learned that the couple where GCY and many others were hidden during the war, was imprisoned shortly after D-Day. Someone, a neighbor, “friend”; had turned them in. It was like that during the war. Danger existed also from the enemy within

The husband, father of Josette, was sent to Dachau for a year. He returned a changed man. The wife, mother of Josette, was sent to a prison in Toulouse for six months.

Josette had a Sunday luncheon recently while we were visiting and gathering more information to film. Unbeknownst to us, she had planned a ceremony to unveil a plaque commemorating her parents and that GCY had been hidden there one night on his way to the Pyrenees to escape the Nazis.

The video is here: https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6jxsm0

In the video, she makes the point of saying that the family never knew what happened to all these people they hid. Several of them were hidden for as much as a month while the parents taught them how to make bombs to undermine the Nazis.

She was saying her family did not know what happened after they helped these men like GCY. I responded in French (on the video), “(After), he broke the sound barrier.” This is the reason for the laughter.

It was a lovely unexpected day bringing the two families closer together.

c. GCYI

Chaque fois que nous revenons dans cette région en France, nous apprenons quelque chose de nouveau des aventures du Général Chuck Yeager (pour dire le moins) quand il a été abattu près de Grignols, au sud-est de Bordeaux.

Cette fois, nous avons appris que le couple où GCY et beaucoup d’autres étaient cachés pendant la guerre, a été emprisonné peu de temps après le jour J. Quelqu’un, un voisin, “ami”; les avait fait rentrer. C’était comme ça pendant la guerre. Le danger existait aussi de l’ennemi au sein de

Le mari, père de Josette, a été envoyé à Dachau pour un an. Il a retourné un homme changé. L’épouse, mère de Josette, a été envoyée dans une prison de Toulouse pendant six mois.

Josette a récemment pris un déjeuner le dimanche pendant que nous rendions visite et rassemblions plus d’informations pour filmer. À notre insu, elle avait prévu une cérémonie pour dévoiler une plaque commémorant ses parents et que GCY avait été caché là une nuit sur son chemin vers les Pyrénées pour échapper aux nazis.

La vidéo est ici: https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x6jxsm0

Dans la vidéo, elle insiste sur le fait que la famille n’a jamais su ce qui est arrivé à toutes ces personnes qu’elle a cachées. Plusieurs d’entre eux ont été cachés pendant un mois, tandis que les parents leur ont appris à fabriquer des bombes pour saper les nazis.

Elle disait que sa famille ne savait pas ce qui s’était passé après avoir aidé ces hommes comme GCY. J’ai répondu en français (sur la vidéo), “(après), il a cassé le mur du son.” C’est la raison du rire.

Ce fut une belle journée inattendue qui rapprochait les deux familles.

c. GCYI

Chuck Yeager Remembers the Flying Wing: YB 49

May 5th, 2018

Good friend of Chuck Yeager, Russ Schleeh, had been a bomber pilot in World War II. Tall, lanky, after the war, he became at various times the Chief Test Pilot for the Bomber Wing and then the Chief Pilot for the Fighter Wing. Unusual.

Chuck told a story at lunch one time about Russ test flying the YB-49, a flying wing. Russ landed, broke his back, saved his co-pilot’s life and tried to block the fire department from putting out the fire: Let it burn! Let the sumbit– burn!

Chuck continued the story at one of the luncheons with a group of pilots and engineers: “Russ ended up in a full body cast except for a couple of spots. Pancho said: I bet he’s thirsty and horny. She put on a big coat, stuffed the pockets with whiskey and brought her best ‘girl’.  Then snuck them both into Russ in his hospital room. She left the whiskey and the girl – I don’t remember her name –”

Russ, 50 years later, “Julie. Her name was Julie, ” said with a look of sheer ecstasy in remembering.

 

George A. D’Angelo Obit I

May 3rd, 2018

George A. D'Angelo & his daughter VictoriaGeorge A. D’Angelo, Esq. and daughter Victoria circa 1993

George A. D’Angelo, Esq., age 91, of Bryn Mawr, PA, died on April 16, 2018. Cause of death unknown.

You may not have known him personally, but you might have noticed a very elegant man dashing to or from his Center City Philadelphia law office, lunch or civic, charitable or cultural meetings or events. He was often described as a true gentleman.

You could tell the seasons by his attire. In summer, he wore his characteristic straw boater and summer three-piece suit which was often a seersucker suit. Like clockwork, on September 15 each year, he switched to his black bowler and darker three-piece pinstripe suit. On a lovely summer evening, you might have noticed him driving his 1949 Cadillac convertible, stopping by Two Street to enjoy an outdoor Mummers concert or swinging by Downey’s for a bite or dining at the Four Seasons or the Philadelphia Club where he often had lunch with friends.

Dad in London

George A. D’Angelo, Esq. in London 1974 to attend a friend’s daughter’s formal wedding.

Born in Philadelphia on December 7, 1926 to Dominic and Lillian D’Angelo, he graduated from Central High School in 1944. He received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania in 1947 and his law degree (JD) from its Law School in 1950 where he graduated in the top five of his class.

He joined Truscott & Erisman, and then formed D’Angelo & Eurell.

He was an Adjunct Professor at Temple University Law School (1954-1969), teaching both professional responsibility and the practice of law. His classes were always oversubscribed which he attributed to his being the only Republican professor there.

His philanthropic interests were mostly in the arts and education in Philadelphia and New York As President of the Philadelphia Art Alliance (1975-1981), he brought in many innovative shows. He remained active as a member of its Board and even as Emeritus he regularly participated in meetings until his retirement. He also recognized the value of education and supported a number of scholarships.

He was honored to have served as President of the Episcopal Church Club of Philadelphia, as Treasurer of the Lawyers Club of Philadelphia, on the Vestry of the Church of St. Asaph’s, and on the Boards of Promesa Foundation, New York, City Innovation, New York, and Hayes Manor Retirement Community, Philadelphia.

He was a member of the Order of the Coif, Pennsylvania 50, Pennsylvania Bar Association, American Bar Association, Philadelphia Bar Association, Philadelphia Club, The Athenaeum, Merion Cricket Club, English-Speaking Union, Doubles (New York), Rittenhouse Club, Philobiblon Club, and a friend of the American Philosophical Society.

He loved to travel, speaking often of how it broadened one’s horizons and perspectives, and of the joy of meeting interesting people from different countries and cultures around the world. Part of his work recently took him to a number of countries in Africa, as part of efforts working with various African agencies to promote tourism and the expansion of investment in Africa. He enjoyed reading, particularly biographies and history, and the theater. He especially enjoyed musicals, notably Gilbert & Sullivan, and was a great ballroom dancer.

He also was an avid sailor and made sure his kids knew how to sail.

George A. D'Angelo, his kids

George A. D’Angelo, father, with his four children circa 1964

He is predeceased by his wife, Antonia Billett D’Angelo (1928-1986) who had a Masters in Psychiatric Social Work and was world-renown in the field for the prevention and treatment of alcoholism and drug abuse, with a particular focus on women’s issues. They met in English Class on her first day at the University of Pennsylvania.

He is survived by his four children, in order of appearance; Marc Scott D’Angelo, Christopher Scott D’Angelo, David Steven D’Angelo, and Victoria Scott Yeager and his longtime companion, Brenda Barak.

Burial will be private. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Please do not send flowers – a charity or two will be named at a future date.

c. GCYI

 

Barbara Bush

April 17th, 2018

From General Chuck Yeager:

I campaigned with President George H.W. Bush (’41) in 1988. Got to know the Bushes a bit.

My plane into DC for an event was late. A reporter asked if she could interview me. She was pregnant, about to pop. I said in your condition, out here waiting, I’ll giveyou all day.

She did a nice article that landed on the 2nd page of the big newspaper.

Vice President Bush invited me to his office. He asked how I got such good coverage.

One stop, Daddy Bush, (as President Bush was affectionately known) said he always takes a 30 minute nap at 5pm. So we went to the suite – there were two single beds. He lay down on one and told me to lie down on the other one, take a nap.

This was the Vice President. I slept with one eye open. I chose not to do what we did during  the war with someone who snored. You kiss him on the lips. He’ll stay up all night staring at you….while you can get some sleep.

I’d speak first and get a big ovation – my books had come out a couple years before and had been wildly popular. VP Bush would come out…not the same reaction. Daddy Bush said, “Yeager, you’re a tough act to follow!”

At the Inaugural Parade, I was the head of it but FL Barbara Bush got her secret service to come get me, it was freezing outside, and have me sit next to her and the heater. Forever grateful.

She was very gracious.

After Glennis, my first wife, died, I got a call. “Chuck! This is Barbara.”

I said, “Who?”

“Barbara Bush, the First Lady. Don’t you know who I am?

I replied, “Yes, ma’am. But you weren’t first lady then.”

She talked with me for a very long time, over an hour. Very comforting.

I never forgot that.

Much later, we were at a baseball game together in Houston. The Bushes then invited Victoria and me to lunch.

After Barbara challenged Victoria on various topics and Victoria answered truthfully but artfully dodging taking Barbara head-on, it came time to order dessert. Daddy Bush asked Victoria if she would like some. He didn’t expect her answer:

She replied her family joke, “It’s the only reason I came.”

Daddy Bush, used to society types who were always watching their figures so never had  dessert, was taken aback but amused.

He offered ice cream. To Victoria’s relief, Barbara said she wanted to hear the list. She wanted the last one – coconut cake with ice cream. Victoria was again relieved – that’s what she wanted.

After lunch, Barbara wanted photos together – a great chronicler. While posing together, Victoria thanked Barbara for ordering that particular dessert, it was great. Barbara noted:  “You didn’t eat much of it!”

Victoria replied, “I haven’t mastered that talking and chewing thing…”

And Barbara offered her  great wisdom. “And don’t ever. You’ll get fat.”

Victoria never forgot that. And has yet to master that talking and chewing thing…

c. GCYI

 

From Chuck Yeager shot down over France

March 7th, 2018

March 4, 1944 1st daylight raid over Berlin. Weather was stinkin’. Only 2 P-51s guarding a box of bombers. They hit their targes. I shot down my first enemy aircraft (a/c). Woo hoo.

I was out of ammo returning home. I espied the stragglers of the bombers in formation heading home. I called ahead. “Can I form up with you, I’m out of ammo and could sure use some protection.”

“Yes.”

“Don’t let your trigger guys shoot me down.” You see, P-51s looked somewhat like German aircraft. Me -109, FW 190.

I formed up. We got home safe.

March 5, 1944: This time we headed to Bordeaux – to bomb a factory. Weather was still stinkin’. We could not see the target so we headed east for a target of opportunity. I was tail-end Charlie, called out bandits at 6:00 and turned into them. Three of them and I did a head on pass.

They won.

I didn’t have to climb out of my a/c – it was falling apart all around me. I stepped off. And free fell for 25,000′.

At around 6000′, I pulled the chute. It…..

opened.

As I floated down, I headed for the forest, grabbed a sapling and rode it to the ground. Just like West Virginia.

I gathered the parachute up, couch-walked in the woods a few miles – had to get away from where I came down in case anyone saw me – and hid.

Ain’t a German in the world can catch a West Virginian in the woods.

As I sat and assessed my situation, I noticed I was wounded, so I opened my survival kit, got out the sulfa powder and put it on my wounds – groin area, hands.

I slept a little.

March 6, 1944: In the morning, I heard a rhythmic banging. I crawled to where I could see – it was a woodsman chopping wood.

We played charades – he didn’t speak English, I didn’t speak French. Told me to wait right there- he would be back.

I moved off 20 yards, repositioned with protection from and a good view of where I had met the woodsman.

He returned with 2 men, whispering: American, where are you?

I sussed them out – they were unarmed and not menacing so I presented myself.

They took me to a Russian lady who spoke English. She ran a sort of hotel.

Her first words: Has America run out of men already that they have to send boys?

When I didn’t respond, she said, Are you married?

Me: No.

RL: “Aha! You are wearing a ring!” as she pointed at my right hand.

I looked; then explained: that’s my high school ring.

RL: That’s your wedding ring finger.

Mr: In America, we were the wedding ring on the left hand.

I guess I pass – not a German trying to infiltrate the Maquis. They give me civilian clothes and hide me in the barn. Some Germans poked in the hay, but I was about as far back as one could get. Just hoping they’d miss. Glad now of the lack of food and being skinny – they can tease me about being skinny all they want – maybe the pitchfork will go either side of me and I’ll have the last laugh.

They told me to rest up – that night they were taking me to another hide-out.

Good – this one was dicey. But the Germans had already been so probably wouldn’t be back….

March 6, 1944 evening: dark

We ride off on bicycles: make it as far as Castaljaloux where they put me in a house for the rest of the night and the next day.

Chuck Yeager Flying Helicopter Like No Other

December 17th, 2017

When General Yeager and I visited with Dick & Pip Smith in 2004 for Dick’s 60th birthday party in Australia, he took us to various places around the east coast of Australia. It was great fun. Dick holds several records – some include 1st to fly around the world solo in a helicopter – went west to east. First to fly around the world by the North to South Pole.

We were sad to leave and the very last day before our flight, Dick took us on a helicopter tour of Sydney. How beautiful -I felt so lucky. I had been to Australia twice before but totally different types of trips.

As we were flying on the north side of Sydney, Dick said, “Chuck would you like to fly?” Chuck said yes so Dick handed him the  controls. He then told Gen Yeager that he wanted to fly over his daughter’s place which was at 7 o’clock. Gen Yeager did a sharp turn to head that direction.

Dick started hyperventilating and talking out loud to himself. “Gasp!….That’s quite an angle…gasp… of attack…gasp…steep…gasp…turn….uh, gasp.. I wouldn’t do that…gasp But I guess…gasp…it’s okay…gasp…it’s Chuck Yeager….”

And it was fine. (But don’t try this at home :-) We flew by Dick’s daughter’s house – we all waved and then headed home.

So many great adventures with GCY.

c. GCYI

Chuck Yeager & M2-F1 Lifting Body

December 3rd, 2017

Chuck Yeager flew the M2-F1  Lifting Body 5 times:

Vehicle              Date               Pilot          Velocity  Altitude    Comments

M2-F1 #18 Dec 3, 1963    Yeager             240 3,650  Duration 00:01:35

 

M2-F1 #25 Jan 29, 1964 Yeager     240   3,650 1st flight of the day
M2-F1 #26 Jan 29, 1964 Yeager     240 3,650 2nd flight of the day
M2-F1 #27 Jan 30, 1964 Yeager     240 3,650 1st flight of the day
M2-F1 #28 Jan 30, 1964 Yeager     240 3,650 2nd flight of the day

Milt Thompson made the first seventeen flights of the M2-F1 during August, September, October, November and December of 1963 and found it a delight to fly and easy to handle in the dead-stick (unpowered glide) landings. Paul Bikle asked his old friend and commandant of the Aerospace Research Pilot school (ARPS) at Edwards Colonel Chuck Yeager to fly the M2-F1 and give his assessment of the vehicle before any other Air Force pilots were allowed to fly it. Yeager made his first flight in the M2-F1 on December 3rd, 1963 (he made a brief car towed flight to 20ft altitude during the last week of November). Yeager was a very competitive pilot and on this his first flight, expanded the flight envelope by flying the M2-F1 at faster and slower speeds during practice landing manoeuvres at altitude that had Milt Thompson.

Then Yeager dove the M2-F1 toward the lakebed at a steeper angle of descent than Milt had used, levelled out and made a greased-on landing right at the spot he said he would touch down at. Yeager exclaimed, “She handles great!” just after climbing out of the cockpit. Another NASA pilot, Bruce Peterson made his second flight that day just after Yeager. Due to the extreme colds from the high altitude, the M2-F1 had been towed to on its previous two flights, the oil in the landing gears shock absorbers had thickened dramatically. This caused the landing gear to fail on Peterson’s touch down. It would be almost two months before repairs could be effected and flight testing resume. During this time, Yeager had a terrible accident in the NF 104 and was badly burned. Nothing short of miraculous, Yeager had recovered sufficiently enough to be restored to flight status and made two flights on January 29th, 1964 along with Milt Thompson and Bruce Peterson.

Yeager asked Dale Reed for permission to roll the M2-F1 in flight, as he believed that he could make a perfect barrel roll in the little craft. Reed denied that request and Yeager never tried to roll it in his last flight in a lifting body that day. Yeager was now a fan of the lifting body concept and told Bikle that the lifting body handled well and that he would like to have a few jet-powered versions (which at that time had not been built) to use at the ARPS for training future lifting body pilots. Nothing came of this proposal, but subsequent rocket powered variants such as the M2-F2, M2-F3, Northrop’s HL-10, Martin’s X-24A & X-24B were successful and were powered by the same Reaction Motors XLR-11 motor as the X-1.

The M2-F1 is on display at the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards AFB, California.

 

Q: General Yeager, why are you so happy?

November 20th, 2017

Answer: I get a job I like. I make my lifestyle fit my income, not the other way around, and I live happily. That’s really the secret to life.